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Tone-Pah-Hote ’18 Is a Udall Scholar

Tarlynn Tone-Pah-Hote
Author: 
Jenna Ray
Publication date: 
April 21, 2017
"The Udall scholarship helps lift the financial burden that goes hand in hand with attending university, and I am beyond grateful for being chosen as a Udall Scholar."—Tarlynn Tone-Pah-Hote ’18

Tarlynn Tone-Pah-Hote '18, Uncasville Connecticut, has been selected as a 2017 Udall Scholar in the field of Native Health Care. Tone-Pah-Hote is one of three University of Minnesota, Morris students who excelled in the prestigious scholarship competition this year.

A biology major and a proud member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma and Oneida from Six Nations, Ontario, Canada, Tone-Pah-Hote is an aspiring physician "dedicated to improving the health of American Indian communities." She hopes to someday become a forensic pathologist and says the Udall award puts her one step closer to making her dream come true.

"The Udall scholarship helps lift the financial burden that goes hand in hand with attending university, and I am beyond grateful for being chosen as a Udall Scholar."

Tone-Pah-Hote has distinguished herself from peers through her research activities, taking part in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates project on the island of Borneo with former Assistant Professor of Biology Michael Ceballos and an on-campus investigation of how tumor cells interact with the immune system, led by Assistant Professor of Biology Rachel Johnson. She also was selected for the Four Directions Summer Research Program at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

"The intellectual challenge was exciting, and this research experience gave me a sense of confidence that I had not previously possessed," Tone-Pah-Hote says of her first project. "It kindled a fire in me."

Tone-Pah-Hote has served as co-chair of the Circle of Nations Indigenous Association and historian of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society, too. These groups allow her "to stay active in the Native community, expressing, sharing, and learning about cultural practices while [she] earns [her] degree."

Two other Morris students fared well in the Udall competition this year: JoMarie Garcia '18 was selected as an Honorable Mention in the field of Native Health Care, and Mckenzie Dice '19 was selected as an Honorable Mention in the field of Environment. A total of five Morris students applied.

According to Professor of History and Coordinator for National and International Fellowships Jennifer Deane, each of Morris's Udall applicants is a credit to the University and should be proud of their accomplishments. "The Udall is an extremely competitive award, and every one of the submitted applications reflected the fine work going on here," she says. "As I see it, our students are exactly the kind of thinkers, researchers, and active citizens that the Udall Foundation wants to support. Hopefully we'll see more applications and awards in the future as well."

The Udall Foundation awards scholarships to college sophomores and juniors for leadership, public service, and commitment to issues related to Native American nations or to the environment. Learn more at udall.gov.