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Where Are They Now: New Alumni Go On to Graduate School

Graduates lined up, seen from behind
Author: 
Sarah Freske ’18
Publication date: 
September 11, 2017

University of Minnesota, Morris alumni go on to attend outstanding graduate schools, and members of the Class of 2017 are no exception. Torri Jordan '17 and Megan Schrader '17 are two of the many new Morris grads who are starting the school year at exceptional institutions.

Torri Jordan '17, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Torri Jordan

Torri Jordan '17 is pursuing a PhD in immunology at the Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Passionate about art and science from her work in and out of the Biology Discipline, Jordan plans to continue exploring the connection between these two fields.

"I was able to take courses in theatre and studio art, which made me realize that my ideal career path was going to involve art and science," says Jordan. "I don't think it is easy to spend as much time in both science and humanities at many universities, but I was able to at Morris."

Jordan said she received personalized instruction from her biology professors, and she credits them with strengthening her as a scientist and enabling her to pursue a PhD. In 2016 Jordan was one of 23 students at Morris to participate in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Undergraduate Summer Research Program, and she presented her research at the Autumn Immunology Conference that fall. She also had the opportunity to take part in several theatre productions at Morris and to run the improv troupe Sports Team.

Megan Schrader '17, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Megan Schrader

Megan Schrader '17 is pursuing a masters in social and cultural anthropology at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Leuven, Belgium. Schrader plans to use this opportunity to explore Europe and experience new languages and cultures.

While studying anthropology and French at Morris, Schrader realized she wanted to continue her education beyond graduation.

"I learned the importance of being a global citizen and being a part of the world," Schrader says. "Going abroad is the best way to do that for me."

As a sophomore Schrader presented at the Central States Anthropological Conference on the topic of seed lending libraries after working on the subject in class. She also took the opportunity to study abroad in Lille, France, for an academic year, which she says opened her eyes to the importance of getting out into the world and learning in different environments.

Ninety-five percent of Morris graduates are employed or enrolled in graduate programs within a year of graduation. Fifty-one percent of students participate in undergraduate research with a faculty member, and 46% study abroad. Learn more at ace.morris.umn.edu.